Tag Archives: classroom transition

Moving On

tough-transition

“A child’s life is like a piece of paper on which every person leaves a mark.” —Chinese Proverb

In a little less than two weeks, my son will enter fifth grade, and my daughter will enter kindergarten. My son, who just recently turned 10, has gone to the same early childhood program since he was 6-weeks-old. This is the same program my daughter currently attends, and she’s been there since her first few months of life, as well. Both of my children have been there full time since infancy. When he began first grade, my son continued to attend this program for before- and after-care during the school year, and then summer camp when school was out every year since.

A couple of weeks ago, we dropped the bomb on him that this would be his last summer there— his time there was coming to an end because he was simply too old to attend anymore. Next summer it would be time to move on to somewhere that was more age-appropriate for him.

From under the brim of his baseball cap, I could see tears welling up in his big, blue eyes. “But, mom, I’ve GROWN UP there! I LOVE that place! I don’t want to leave.” I understood him completely. To be honest, I didn’t want him to go, either. The people that work at that program literally helped my husband and I raise our children— they were our village. He was safe there, he was loved.

Many of you reading this have children in your programs that are going through similar transitions this time of year. Whether you’re saying goodbye to your school-agers, sending your preschoolers off to kindergarten, or transitioning your infants up to the toddler room, there are many things that you, as an early childhood educator, can do to help ease the uncertainty of this process.

  • Develop a transition plan. The first thing to keep in mind, when helping a child transition to a new classroom or setting, is that this will be a transition for not just the child, but for their family, as well. Meeting with family members to develop a transition plan before the actual transition takes place is a helpful tool to get everyone on the same page about how and when everything will occur. Get input about what the child might need to make the transition a successful one, and find out what questions or concerns the family may have about the process. . If possible, have both the child’s “current ” and “new” teachers be part of developing this plan. The “current ” teacher often has knowledge of how the child functions in a school setting that would be helpful for the “new” teacher to know.
  • Provide age-appropriate activities in the classroom in preparation for the transition. When children are preparing to move to a new classroom or educational setting, classroom teachers can provide a multitude of activities to help ready children for their move. Keep in mind what skills or knowledge would be helpful for the child to have in their new setting, and start working on those things while they’re still in your room. For example, a toddler who’s moving to a preschool room might benefit from working on self-help skills such as throwing their own items away after lunch or snack, or pulling their own pants up and down when beginning to use the potty. A school-age teacher might role play with his/her class how to shake hands, look someone in the eye, and introduce themselves.
  • Involve the children in conversations regarding their upcoming move. Having positive conversations with the children in your care about their new classroom or school can also be helpful. Use their new teacher’s name (if you know it), show them photos of their new environment, or even take a walk or a field trip there.

Ironically, as much as we care for the children in our programs, as early childhood educators it is ultimately our goal to help children reach a place where they no longer need us. Growing up and moving on are good things—they are natural parts of life that can be exciting and wonderful!

Change Is Hard.

toddler-transition

Summer is upon us. School has ended and many transitions are happening. For me, I have had to adjust my route to work because my son is going to summer camp instead of the bus stop or the drop off line at school. I have to remember to pack his lunch and the items in his backpack have changed. Rather than homework and a clarinet, there needs to be sunscreen, a water bottle, swim suit and a towel. Now that my son is eleven and knows that summer means a break from school (except for summer homework), it is an awesome and exciting event each year. These types of transitions have not always been so smooth.

Change is difficult for people in general. Especially when our typical routine is disrupted by life changes, such as moving from one classroom to another. All children need a strong, secure attachment in order to feel safe in their environment. A child’s temperament can dictate how they will react to change and the intensity to which they will need support from a new caregiver to feel safe and secure in their new environment. There is no telling, sometimes, how long this support will have to last.

Here are some tips for caregivers to use to support a child’s transition into a new classroom:

  • Understand that the way you have seen a child handle new situations can be a clue to how they will react in a new environment. If a child enters a new situation without much hesitation or little reassurance, this could indicate that a transition will run rather smoothly. A child that tends to have a tough time separating from their family at drop off or has the need of staying close to their caregiver may need added support through a transition.
  • Create a transition schedule to follow so that everyone is on the same page, this includes all caregivers/teachers and the child’s family. A sample schedule may consist of a span of two weeks. The first few days a child can have the opportunity to visit for an hour or two (with a current caregiver, if possible) and then return to the current environment. The time spent in the new environment should increase to include a lunch, naptime, afternoon and pick up experience. Note that this schedule may and will change based on the child.
  • Prepare children for change by making a transition book. Take pictures of the current and new classroom. Create a book to show children what is similar between the current classroom and the new one, along with pictures that will show things that will be new, such as pictures of the new teachers. Allow children to take the book back and forth between home and the program so it can be read to them in both environments for consistency.
  • Offer the opportunity for a family member or caregiver to visit with the child in order to establish the sense of trust for the new environment. Set up a separation routine for children, which could consist of sitting down for a few minutes at the breakfast table, reading a book, or handing off to a caregiver before saying goodbye for the day.
  • Go with the child’s flow. If they are ready to explore, let them. If they need to be held, hold them. Holding children for long periods of time in group care can be challenging. During the times that you cannot do so, let the child know that you are going to put them down before doing so. Let them know they are welcome to stay close as you change a diaper or help another child at drop off. Telling this to children out loud as it happens will help children understand that even though you may not be able to hold them that they still matter and you are there for them.

All in all, it is important to remember not to rush into a transition. Keep in mind the importance of preparing children for what is coming next and that it can take time for children to adjust to a new environment and the new faces in the room. Be empathetic and compassionate to how children may feel and use the transition as a teachable moment to discuss feelings, promote pro-social behavior and as always remember to be flexible.

Who should be ready, the preschool or the preschooler?

I was looking through the Sunday ads in the newspaper this past weekend and I noticed that back-to-school advertisements are in full force. New glue sticks and scissors, notebooks and pencils are all part of the back-to-school rituals at my house. I was talking with a good friend of mine about the trials and tribulations of sending kids back to school with the myriad of supplies that need to be purchased. She doesn’t have children who are old enough for elementary school yet. She does however have a 3 year-old son so I asked if she was planning to send him to preschool this year. Her answer surprised me. She said that she didn’t think he was ready. And that got me thinking, who needs to be ready, the preschool or the preschooler?

Who should be ready, the preschool or the preschooler?

As a former classroom teacher for children ages 3 – 5, I spent many hours preparing the environment for the children who were enrolled in my classroom. I worked hard to have a safe space with materials that were interesting and engaging. I planned my lessons by starting with the knowledge of what children who are ages 3 – 5 should be able to do and what I hoped they would be able to do by the time they left to go to kindergarten. For all children who entered my room, my hope was that they came to play each day so that I could get to know them and plan things that were of interest to them. I hoped that they had a change of clothes just in case we found ourselves immersed in something messy. I hoped that they learned to love learning. I hope that I challenged them to try something new.

I believe that it was my responsibility to be prepared for the children who came each day.

So as you look forward to a new set of children in your classroom this year, I hope you take time to be ready for them. Happy New School Year!