Change Is Hard.

toddler-transition

Summer is upon us. School has ended and many transitions are happening. For me, I have had to adjust my route to work because my son is going to summer camp instead of the bus stop or the drop off line at school. I have to remember to pack his lunch and the items in his backpack have changed. Rather than homework and a clarinet, there needs to be sunscreen, a water bottle, swim suit and a towel. Now that my son is eleven and knows that summer means a break from school (except for summer homework), it is an awesome and exciting event each year. These types of transitions have not always been so smooth.

Change is difficult for people in general. Especially when our typical routine is disrupted by life changes, such as moving from one classroom to another. All children need a strong, secure attachment in order to feel safe in their environment. A child’s temperament can dictate how they will react to change and the intensity to which they will need support from a new caregiver to feel safe and secure in their new environment. There is no telling, sometimes, how long this support will have to last.

Here are some tips for caregivers to use to support a child’s transition into a new classroom:

  • Understand that the way you have seen a child handle new situations can be a clue to how they will react in a new environment. If a child enters a new situation without much hesitation or little reassurance, this could indicate that a transition will run rather smoothly. A child that tends to have a tough time separating from their family at drop off or has the need of staying close to their caregiver may need added support through a transition.
  • Create a transition schedule to follow so that everyone is on the same page, this includes all caregivers/teachers and the child’s family. A sample schedule may consist of a span of two weeks. The first few days a child can have the opportunity to visit for an hour or two (with a current caregiver, if possible) and then return to the current environment. The time spent in the new environment should increase to include a lunch, naptime, afternoon and pick up experience. Note that this schedule may and will change based on the child.
  • Prepare children for change by making a transition book. Take pictures of the current and new classroom. Create a book to show children what is similar between the current classroom and the new one, along with pictures that will show things that will be new, such as pictures of the new teachers. Allow children to take the book back and forth between home and the program so it can be read to them in both environments for consistency.
  • Offer the opportunity for a family member or caregiver to visit with the child in order to establish the sense of trust for the new environment. Set up a separation routine for children, which could consist of sitting down for a few minutes at the breakfast table, reading a book, or handing off to a caregiver before saying goodbye for the day.
  • Go with the child’s flow. If they are ready to explore, let them. If they need to be held, hold them. Holding children for long periods of time in group care can be challenging. During the times that you cannot do so, let the child know that you are going to put them down before doing so. Let them know they are welcome to stay close as you change a diaper or help another child at drop off. Telling this to children out loud as it happens will help children understand that even though you may not be able to hold them that they still matter and you are there for them.

All in all, it is important to remember not to rush into a transition. Keep in mind the importance of preparing children for what is coming next and that it can take time for children to adjust to a new environment and the new faces in the room. Be empathetic and compassionate to how children may feel and use the transition as a teachable moment to discuss feelings, promote pro-social behavior and as always remember to be flexible.