Let Mother Nature Do the Teaching

Take a hike! Let mother nature do the teaching.

Take a hike! Let mother nature do the teaching.

Welcome Kelly Ely, 4C for Children Professional Development Specialist, to the blog team for 2016!

Exploring the outdoors is an incredible way to promote development in preschool children. The opportunities to encourage children’s inquiry and learning are endless. Experiences in nature can allow teachers to focus on all developmental domains—including cognitive, social emotional, physical well being, language and literacy, and the child’s approach toward learning. Children are naturally curious; therefore a nature trail is the perfect environment to prompt children to ask questions that lead to higher-level thinking.

Think of the woods as an outdoor classroom. The teacher can call attention to specific items seen on a hiking trail, such as animal homes, rocks, various trees, and plants. Often times in a classroom, teachers ask students to “stop talking” during lessons. While taking a nature walk, children will undoubtedly be inspired to talk to one another, fostering language development. Teachers can ask questions such as, “What do you think birds use to build their nests?” and the children can work together to discuss their hypothesis with other students. Collaboration is one of the keys to successful social emotional development. Successful team work creates a positive climate in the classroom. Students are empowered by the idea that they are explorers working together to get answers. Empathy, another important social emotional skill, can be encouraged in such as teaching children to be gentle with nature and not destroy or damage animal homes.

The opportunities for physical development in nature are endless. Beyond students running, walking, bending and following a trail, teachers can use this time to engage their fine motor skills. Picking up leaves, small rocks, and other small objects enhance children’s ability to use their pincher grasp with their index finger and thumb. Children love the challenge brought by this hands on task.

Items both large and small can be brought back to the classroom to further investigate and examine in depth. Student’s will enjoy activities that allow them to be “scientists” as they compare, contrast and classify items that they have discovered.  Children feel trusted and independent when teachers give them tools and ask them to investigate their findings and report what they see. A love of science grows from learning that exploring can be fun, as well as educational.

Before taking children on a nature walk, I would suggest reading a well-illustrated nature book as an introduction. This provides a great opportunity for children to become familiar with things to look for on the walk. It also allows provides a time to brainstorm with the children about what they already know about nature and what they would like to learn. Teacher’s can take learning to the next level after the walk is completed by placing books in the library relating to things seen on their adventure.

These teachable moments are not limited to preschool teachers; parents can share these same experiences at home with their children. If you do not have access to a nature trail, look no further than your own backyard or school yard for these opportunities to expand your child’s learning. Remember as you create lesson plans for your classroom or plan learning experiences for your child… there is a whole world of possibilities outside waiting to be explored!