Be where the children are!

Be-where-children-are

Children learn a lot through interacting with each other—and with their teachers!

I was recently thinking about my time as an Early Childhood Education student. I chuckled remembering my practicum in an infant room. I thought I might share some reflections on these first experiences.

I had a lot of experience in a preschool room, but really, close to zero experience in an infant room. As a student teacher, I did not directly set up the materials in the room, but I did have a role in using the materials in the room to encourage and facilitate the infants in interactions and experiences that to support their emotional, social and motor development.

Some of the older infants liked to get on top of the mats and pretend they were on stage and clap their hands. I interacted with them when they were doing this by singing along and clapping my hands with them. One of the most popular materials in the room was a container that played music every time a ball was dropped down one of the holes. When the children were playing with this toy I would try to encourage development such as vocabulary by saying what I saw them doing. I remember really struggling to come up with questions or statements that would encourage a higher level of thought. That was a skill that definitely came easier with time and experience.

Another favorite area of the room was for building perceptual skills. There was a shelf with colorful blocks on it, a mat and a mirror. The blocks were soft so they didn’t hurt if a child dropped one on them or hit another child with it. When an infant was in the area by the blocks, I loved to go over and try to model how to stack them. I set one on top of another and then would take it back off. I really enjoyed it when an infant tried to copy what I did.

I think one of the most important things I learned during my time in the infant room, was that no matter where the children were in the room, it was important to go there and be with them. I just got down on the floor and used every opportunity as a time for meaningful interactions. The text book I used during that student teaching experience was Infants, Toddlers, and Caregivers, by Janet Gonzalez-Mena and Dianne Widmeyer Eyer and it included a list of ten principals for care giving (Which can be applied in working with all age groups). They are:

  1. Involve infants and toddlers in things that interest them.
  2. Invest quality time.
  3. Learn each child’s unique ways of communicating and teach them yours.
  4. Invest time and energy to build a total person.
  5. Respect infants and toddlers as worthy people.
  6. Be honest about your feelings.
  7. Model the behavior you want to teach.
  8. Recognize problems as learning opportunities and let (infants and toddlers) try to solve their own.
  9. Build security by teaching trust.
  10. Be concerned with the quality of development in each stage.