“I don’t care about the letter __. My name starts with T!”

Letter recognition is one of the many priorities we face in the early childhood classroom. As educators we want our children to be prepared when it’s time for them to say goodbye to their preschool years. Often I find teachers incorporate letter recognition by utilizing the “Letter of the Week” strategy. However, best practice in early childhood education informs us that we should plan based on the individual child and their interests. My question to educators: is there a more natural and meaningful way to introduce children to the letters of the alphabet?

If you observe closely you will find that incorporating the letter of the week strategy is not of interest to many children. From my experience, I often observe most children wriggling around, talking to friends, playing with “closed” materials, and generally disengaged as the letter of the week is introduced. Why are so many of these children disengaged? Could it be that they don’t care about this letter because it’s not meaningful to them? The letters that children are most focused on in this stage of development are the letters in their own name. The letters in their name and the letters in the names of their peers are very important to young children!

In this classroom, the teacher created a fun activity for children to match the blocks to the letters of their name and their peers names

In this classroom, the teacher created a fun activity for children to match wooden alphabet blocks to the letters on their name card and on the name cards of their peers

So how can we utilize this interest and expand it to meeting the goals of letter recognition? Is there a way to incorporate letter activities as children play? Below are some of the ways you could incorporate the use of children’s name cards for various purposes in the classroom. Children could:

  • Find and use their name card to save their work
  • Copy the letters from the name cards to create a waiting list or write a letter home
  • Hang their name up on an attendance or interactive chart
  • Hang the names of their peers up on an interactive chart
  • Find their names at the lunch table
  • Fill out a “lunch request” form asking to sit next to a peer at lunch time

As children utilize their name and the names of their peers, they are recognizing many letters of the alphabet in a natural, meaningful and fun way. Then as children are developmentally ready and interested to gain more letter experiences outside their own name and the names of their peers, conversations and activities about other letters will become more natural and meaningful.

If we force children to focus on something they are not interested in, it becomes work or a chore to them. It feels like a test and drill situation. As educators we understand that children learn best through hands on activities and through play. According to best practice we should be focusing on what the child is interested in and plan from there, even when it comes to letter recognition.

For more great ways to enhance children’s literacy development please look into the training: “Moving Beyond Letter of the Week.” This training and many others can be located on 4C for Children’s online professional development opportunities catalog: http://www.4cforchildren.org/pdo

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About Tracy Schnirring

I am a professional development specialist at 4C for Children My main role is supporting preschool teachers through classroom coaching to best practice and Step Up To Quality (Ohio’s star-rating system). I am also certified to conduct program/child assessments and facilitate several workshops for 4C. In addition to my role at 4C, I am a daughter, sister, aunt, friend, and mother. The person who brings me the most joy in life is my 7-year-old boy. Outside of work, I enjoy spending time with family and friends, playing sports with my son, and being outdoors.

One thought on ““I don’t care about the letter __. My name starts with T!”

  1. Sharon Kirkwood

    After reading this, I completely agree.

    I was a lead teacher at a childcare center for 12 toddlers. Using the letter of the week never really got their attention. I would read books that would emphasize the letter of the week, but maybe 3-4 kids would engage more.

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