Bathed in Books

Recently I visited my sister and three-year-old nephew. When I visit he is always ready to play; he loves to play with his cars and to play “indoor hockey.” At one point during my visit he brought an armful of books over to me and said, “Becky, will you read to me?” Of course I read the many books he brought! He sat and listened attentively, and even “read” along with some of the stories. This is a regular occurrence during my visits as well, and his bookshelf is always full of new books because his family makes a trip to the local library every Saturday.

There are a few things that are important to remember when it comes to children and reading, and for the parent or caregiver who wants to encourage early language and literacy skills, bear these things in mind!

  1. Children develop at their pace – Each child is at their own developmental stage of reading, writing, talking and listening. We must be aware of the variances of the children we work with and provide opportunities for each child appropriate to their level of learning.
  2. Interest is key – Children explore when they have the interest. Would your child rather build with blocks than listen to a story? How about a story about building or construction? Authors of children’s books have the challenge of creating books that include interesting content and eye-catching pictures. A book must catch a child’s interest in order for them to want to listen or read.
  3. Reading to children – It is important to examine your reading style. How you read to children can affect their interest in books and reading. Do show excitement? Do you read using varying voices?
  4. Books, books everywhere – Children should be “bathed” in books and language. As adults, we must make books available and accessible to young children at all times. Take a look around your environment; are there books in every learning center? Can the children handle them regularly? Be brave, offer books of poetry, building and construction, appropriate magazines, cook books, etc. Children should be exposed to varying cultures, as well.

It is important to remember that reading is an essential skill for everyday living. It is our task, as parents and early childhood providers, to expose young children to all kinds of books, and to include them in our children’s lives everyday. For more information and book ideas visit Scholastic’s Web site for children’s book lists, read-aloud hints, and learning tips. Happy reading!

2 thoughts on “Bathed in Books

  1. Tara McClintick

    Awesome info! I especially loved the “Interest is key” advice – that is so true! If you use books to build on your childrens interests it is a wonderful way to expand learning while fostering a love of books at the same time.

  2. Kathleen Bryan

    Tara,
    I agree with you about building on children’s interests. If I had not read a variety of books with my son when he was little I would never have known his love for horses. I had read The Big Red Barn to him one day and from that day on, he begged me to read “the horse book”. I went through every book I had searching for a book on horses, and he brought me The Big Red Barn book. I was so relieved that I understood what his favorite book was that he was requesting, but he was thrilled with the many new horse related books I had found.

Comments are closed.